Healthy communities

We work to empower and protect communities from toxic chemicals and pollution so that we can all have clean air, safe drinking water, and a healthy environment.

Photo by Kai Keisuke

We work with our clients to keep toxic chemicals out of our homes and the environment and we go to court to make sure polluters are held to account. We are fighting for world-class environmental laws and stronger environmental standards, including the addition of the right to a healthy environment to Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Currently, Canada’s patchwork of environmental laws and weak regulatory standards mean that thousands of people, disproportionately those in First Nations communities, do not have access to clean running water while thousands of other Canadians are exposed to harmful levels of air pollution every day. Dozens of toxic chemicals already banned in other countries can still be legally used within our borders.

There is a direct connection between the strength of our laws and the health of our environment. In the last 50 years, the right to a healthy environment has gained recognition faster than any other human right. Canada has fallen behind the over 110 countries that legally recognize the right to a healthy environment. We are working toward a Charter right to a healthy environment for Canadians because we know it will be a powerful catalyst to improving the quality of our laws, our environment and our health.

At Ecojustice, we believe that environmental rights are human rights, and we are leading the charge to make Canada’s environmental laws the strongest in the world.

Healthy communities blog posts

Healthy communities

VICTORY: Pollinators will get their day in court!

Healthy communities

We’re going back to court over air pollution in Ontario

Healthy communitiesSpecial Update

Much to celebrate in committee report on Canadian Environmental Protection Act

Healthy communities cases

In Progress

Protecting pollinators from neonicotinoids

In Progress

Seeking justice for contaminated Thane Smelter site

In Progress

Waterproof: Monitoring Canada’s Drinking Water