You may remember that we launched our biggest-ever species at risk lawsuit this past fall.

Together with our friends at Animal Justice, we filed an application seeking to ensure that the province of Ontario create and release recovery strategies for dozens of at-risk species, including the northern bobwhite, black redhorse, gypsy cuckoo bumble bee and Kentucky coffee-tree.

Today, we are excited to tell you that the province will be launching public updates on the progress made in developing recovery strategies for the plants and animals listed above — and 33 other species at risk.

As a result of settlement negotiations between our clients and the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, the ministry will soon begin sharing quarterly updates on Ontario.ca.

Thanks this agreement, Ecojustice and Animal Justice can hold the government accountable—and we will go back to court to ensure progress with the recovery strategies if we must.

This is a major victory for species at risk in the province. We could not have done it without the support of people like you.

In Ontario, across Canada and around the world, biodiversity is under unprecedented threat.

Here at Ecojustice, we work to defend nature by going to court to protect and restore species at risk, and by advocating for strong, enforceable laws and policies that protect our planet.

With the help of supporters like you, we are actively working to keep wild salmon healthy, to secure Species at Risk Act protections for threatened boreal caribou in Alberta and to protect pollinators.

And now, thanks to these quarterly updates, we will better be able to work with other environmental groups, supporters and members of the public, and with the government itself to continue working to ensure the recovery of these 37 species.

We rely on our supporters to help us build the case for a better earth. Please, give a gift today to help make sure we have the resources we need to continue the fight to protect species at risk, now and in the future.

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Photo of Northern Bobwhite quail by Steve Maslowski/USFWS, via Flickr. Image obtained under Creative Commons