Sometimes we’re asked whether the lawsuits we launch are effective. Now, backed up by a new research paper, co-authored by Ecojustice senior staff scientist Susan Pinkus, we’re happy to report that yes, our lawsuits can make a big difference — especially for Canada’s endangered wildlife.

Citing landmark Ecojustice victories like our work to protect resident killer whale populations and the Nooksack dace, the paper concludes that: “A 50% increase in recovery strategies that identified critical habitat following precedent-setting court judgments suggests that legal action by nongovernmental organizations played a key role in the evolution of recovery policy for species at risk in Canada.”

While we have a strong track record of successfully using the law and science to protect Canada’s endangered wildlife — learn more in the 2013 Victories Report — our work is far from done.  That’s why Ecojustice’s lawyers and scientists are forging ahead with continued efforts to make sure the most vulnerable of Canada’s species are given the chance to survive and recover:

  • We’re standing up for an iconic prairie bird, the Greater sage-grouse. Without immediate action these birds — best known for their spectacular mating dance — could be extinct in Canada in less than 10 years.
  • We’re also challenging the federal government’s unlawful delays in producing recovery strategies for four species (Pacific humpback whale, Nechako White Sturgeon, Marbled Murrelet and Southern Mountain Caribou), whose habitat would be adversely affected by Enbridge’s proposed Northern Gateway pipeline.
  • We’ve bolstered our presence in Ottawa to pressure the federal government to save the Species at Risk Act, one of the last effective environmental laws left standing after last year’s devastating omnibus budget bills.

Do you care about endangered wildlife? Let your voice be heard – send a message of support today to the Ecojustice lawyers and scientists who are on the frontlines of the fight to save Canada’s species at risk.